Point of order

A point of order is a tool, which is used to draw attention to a breach in rules, an irregularity in procedure, the irrelevance or continued repetition of a speaker or the breaching of established practices or contradiction of a previous decision.

It can be used at any time during a meeting including interrupting a speaker, but it must be valid. A point of order is not raised because you disagree with or do not like what is being said.

How do you raise a point of order?
You do not move a point of order, you raise it or take it. The method is to say the words “point of order”, wait for the chair to acknowledge the point of order and then state it clearly. Whether you normally stand to speak in your meetings or not, it is wise to stand when raising a point of order so that it is perfectly clear that a) there is a serious point of order being raised, and b) to identify the person raising the point.

Caution
Do not use points of order too much. Many people use them to disagree with the speakers’s opinion. When they are used either incorrectly, or too much, the other people in the meeting frequently tire of the person raising them and he or she loses support.

To see my full article on Points of Order, click here.

Related posts:

  1. What does the chair do when a Point of Order is called? What must the chair do when a point of order is raised? Immediately a point of order is raised the chair must stop the speaker or stop the process of the meeting and deal with the point of order. The...
  2. Point of Order – what, why, when and how A point of order is a tool, which is used to draw attention to a breach in rules, an irregularity in procedure, the irrelevance or continued repetition of a speaker or the breaching of established practices or contradiction of a...
  3. Examples of Points of Order Examples of correct “Points of Order” … point of order Mr Chairperson,… the speaker is not speaking to the motion. … point of order, …. allowing this person to move this motion contravenes standing order number 34, that the mover...

2 Comments »

  1. avatar Denise Goold Says:

    Thankyou for the comprehensive description of point of order which has always confused me. Point of order seems to be used for almost anything.

  2. avatar Clive Says:

    Can you raise a point of order against the chairman?

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