Special General Meetings

I have received a question from Liza:

Can you provide an example of a Special General Meeting?

A Special General Meeting has the same status as an Annual General Meeting. The key is the word “General” which essentially means that it is a meeting of all members or constituents. The Annual General Meeting (AGM)  is obviously held annually. A Special General Meeting (SGM) is held using exactly the same processes and notice requirements as an AGM, but is held between AGM’s. Technically, there is no limit to the number of SGM’s there can be (unless the rules of your organisation dictate it – I’ve never seen that by the way).

The reason an SGM would be held could be any of the following:

  • To consider changes to the constitution or rules;
  • To consider a special resolution – such as granting a life membership, expelling a member, approving a special budget item etc;
  • To receive an auditor’s report or a report or submission from another person or body or organisation.

Usually and SGM is to consider rule changes but not always.

An SGM is often also called an EGM – Extraordinary General Meeting. Nothing is different except for the name.

Please Note: The author accepts no responsibility for anything which occurs directly or indirectly as a result of using any of the suggestions or procedures detailed in this blog. All suggestions and procedures are provided in good faith as general guidelines only and should be used in conjunction with relevant legislation, constitutions, rules, laws, by-laws, and with reasonable judgement.

David Julian Price

www.davidprice.com

david@davidprice.com

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